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user-cont/release-bot: Release to Github and PyPI with ease.

Automate releases on Github and PyPi.
Description
This is a bot that helps maintainers deliver their software to users. It is meant to watch github repositories for
release pull requests. The PR must be named in one of the following formats:
0. 1. 0 release if you want to create the “0. 0” upstream release
new major release, release-bot would then initiate a release from e. g. “1. 2. 3” to “2. 0. 0″
new minor release e. 3” to “1. 3. 0″
new patch release e. 4”
Release-bot now works with SemVer only.
Once the PR is merged, bot will create a new Github release and a PyPi release respectively.
Changelog will be pulled from root of the
repository and must be named Changelog for the new
version must begin with version heading, i. e # 0. 0.
Everything between this heading and the heading for previous version will be pulled into the changelog.
Alternatively, you can let the bot do the boring work, update __version__
variable and fill changelog with commit messages from git log.
You can trigger this action by creating an issue and name it the same as you would do for a release PR, e. 0 release, new major release, new minor release, new patch release.
All you have to do after that is merge the PR that the bot will make.
The bot works with
pypa/setuptools_scm plugin. If
you’re using it, you don’t need to care about __version__ at all. You can be
also sure that the bot will make the PyPI release correctly — before it
releases the software, it checks out the tag in the git repo.
A file is required. See Configuration section for details.
Once a Github release is complete, bot will upload this release to PyPI.
Note that you have to setup your login details (see Requirements).
Try it locally
Install
$ pip install release-bot
Other possible installations are through Arch User Repository or install on repo as Github Application.
First interaction with release bot may be automated releases on Github. Let’s do it.
Configure the release bot
Release bot can be configured in two ways, using release-bot init or manually
Configuration using release-bot init
Clone the upstream repository where new releases will be published
and from the root dir of the repository run the following command:
Enter the required details when asked by the bot. All of the default choices provided by the init should be enough for the current trial. You will also need to generate a Github personal access token.
Recommended permissions for access token are: repo, delete_repo, user.
You can later on modify all the config files. For possible advanced setup check the documentation for an upstream repository and gitchangelog.
After the init is completed commit all of the changes and push it to the upstream repo.
Manual Configuration
1. Create upstream repository or use existing one
This is meant to be upstream repository where new releases will be published.
Within upstream repository create file which contains info on how to release the specific project.
Copy and edit
At the end of add this line of code:
# whether to allow bot to make PRs based on issues
trigger_on_issue: true
Then copy. and (which are the config files for the gitchangelog)
to the root dir of the upstream repository.
For possible advanced setup check the documentation for an upstream repository and gitchangelog.
2. Create
Create configuration file You can use one from this repository. You will need to generate a Github personal access token.
# Name of the account that the github_token belongs to
# Only needed for triggering the bot on an issue.
github_username:
gitchangelog: true
Note: This file should not be stored in upstream repository as it contains sensitive data.
For possible advanced setup check the documentation for a private repository.
Also, see requirements in case you want include PyPi releases.
Run the release-bot
At this point, release-bot is installed. At least four configuration files are set,,., (optionally).
Launch bot by a command:
$ release-bot -c <> –debug
You can scroll down and see debug information of running bot.
Make a new release
Create an issue having 0. 1 release as a title in your upstream repository. You can select your own version numbers.
Wait for the bot to make a new PR based on this issue (refresh interval is set in).
Once the PR is merged bot will make a new release.
Check release page of your upstream repository at GitHub and you should see new release 0. 1.
Since now, feel free to create releases automatically just by creating issues.
Configuration
There are two yaml configuration files:
— a config for the bot itself with some sensitive data (recommended to store in private repo)
— stored in upstream repository and contains info on how to release the specific project.
There are two more files required if you use gitchangelog to genereate change logs:. — a config file used by the gitchangelog to specify the regex for converting commits and the output engine
— a template file used by pystache to genereate markdown
Private repository
You need to setup a git repository, where you’ll store the and files.
If this is not a local repository, make sure it’s private so you prevent any private info leaking out.
If the path to is not passed to bot with -c/–configuration,
bot will try to find it in current working directory.
Here are the configuration options:
Option
Required
repository_name
Name of your Github repository
Yes
repository_owner
Owner of the repository
github_token
Github personal access token
github_username
Name of the account that the github_token belongs to. Only needed for triggering the bot on an issue.
No
github_app_installation_id
Installation ID (a number) of the Github app.
github_app_id
ID (a number) of the Github app.
github_app_cert_path
Path to a certificate which Github provides as an auth mechanism for Github apps.
refresh_interval
Time in seconds between checks on repository. If not provided, run only once and exit.
clone_url
URL used to clone your Github repository. By default, variant is used.
gitchangelog
Whether to use gitchangelog to generate change logs. False by default.
Sample config named can be found in this repository.
Regarding github_token, it’s usually a good idea to create a Github account for the bot
(and use its Github API token)
so you can keep track of what changes were made by bot and what are your own.
You can also create a Github app and use it as an authentication mechanism for
the bot. For that you need to specify the three config values prefixed with
github_app.
Note: If the Upstream repository is a Private Github repository, it is required to specify the SSH URL
of the repository as the clone_url option in This will allow the bot to authenticate using SSH, when fetching from the Upstream repository.
Upstream repository
You also have to have a file in the root of your upstream project repository.
Here are possible options:
Meaning
changelog
List of changelog entries. If empty, changelog defaults to $version release
author_name
Author name for changelog. If not set, author of the merge commit is used
author_email
Author email for changelog. If not set, author of the merge commit is used
pypi
Whether to release on pypi. True by default
pypi_project
Name of your PyPI repository
trigger_on_issue
Whether to allow bot to make PRs based on issues. True by default.
labels
List of labels that bot will put on issues and PRs
GitChangeLog
For using the gitchangelog you must add the line gitchanelog: true to the, and add the files. and in the root of your upstream project repository. Sample config files:. and. sample is heavily commented and should be enough to make modification but for specific details you can refer to the original repository.
The default template is configured to create Markdown divided into sections (New, Changes, Fix, Others) based on the commits. The data sent to the output engine pystache by the gitchangelog is in the following format. You can use it to create a custom template, please refer mustache.
Requirements
Are specified in
You have to setup your PyPI login details in $HOME/ as described in
PyPI documentation.
Github Application
Release-bot as Github Application is currently in testing and will be available soon in Github market.
Github application will speed-up configuration process.
Arch User Repository
For Arch or Arch based Linux distributions, you can install the bot from the AUR Package.
You can use your favourite AUR Helper to install the package. For instance:
You can also install it by using the PKGBUILD from the AUR repository.
To build the package, download the PKGBUILD and exectute:
$ makepkg -cs #c flag cleans the extra remaining source and compiled files. s flag installs the dependencies if you don’t have it.
To install the package execute,
$ sudo pacman -U
If you are interested in making contribution to release-bot project, please read Contribution guide for more information.
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Created by Marián Mrva – @surfer19
Are Sneaker Bots Illegal? Time for a Serious Discussion! - NikeShoeBot

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Are Sneaker Bots Illegal? Time for a Serious Discussion! – NikeShoeBot

The industry is ever-growing, and sneaker bots became a must-have for any sneakerhead! If you’re looking for a pair of exclusive sneakers, then your chance is next to zero. Especially if you’re copping manually. But you know, we always have the moral dilemma of the legality of stuff like that. Which leaves us asking the question: Are sneaker bots illegal? We’re gonna discuss this and come up with a final verdict. So shall we?
What Is a Sneaker Bot?
If you’re new to the industry and just getting into the world of botting, you gotta understand it well. So a sneaker bot is a program that does everything a human would do when buying goods. However, it does it much faster and many more times. That way, a sneaker bot can ensure that you get a better chance at buying the item you want.
Although that sounds like a pretty simple feat, you gotta read more about sneaker bots. Why? Because firstly, you definitely should get one. And secondly, because a sneaker bot can’t give you what you need without sneaker proxies. Just like salt n pepper, they always make your cooking taste better!
Are Sneaker Bots Illegal?
So sneaker bots are a pretty gray area legally speaking. There is no law that forbids you from using an actual sneaker bot to buy sneakers or anything else. However, sneaker bots usually violate the store’s terms and conditions and whatnot. You see, some stores have a 1 pair per customer policy. So when a sneaker bot cops multiple sneakers for just one person, it’s violating the policy. But are sneaker bots illegal because of that? They’re not!
Sneaker stores are also taking matters into their own hands. Sneaker protection became a very developed branch of cybersecurity with the rise of bots! But well, sneaker bots still obviously have the upper hand in this. And really, sneaker bots and the game of exclusivity kinda boosts sales at some point. So we don’t see brands and corporations hunting down sneaker bots any time soon. Sneaker bots and the magic of “sold out” kinda go hand in hand, and let’s not forget the aftermarket!
Are Sneaker Bots Illegal – A Little Piece of Our Mind
Well, the final verdict is: No, sneaker bots are not illegal. And they probably will stay that way for a long long time. With everything going on in the world, nobody will waste the time and effort on this yet. So if you’re still going through a moral dilemma about owning a sneaker bot, don’t! A sneaker bot will give you the best of both worlds.
And to make your life even easier, here’s a round-up of the best sneaker bots of 2021. You’ll find everything you need there! And maybe that will help you decide whether you wanna dive into the awesome world of bots. But if you’re specifically interested in NSB, click the button below to make the best investment today! Godspeed
Post Views:
1, 952
Tags: sneaker bot, sneaker proxies Posted in Sneaker Bot, Sneakers
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Here's Everything You Need to Know About Footsites - NikeShoeBot

Here’s Everything You Need to Know About Footsites – NikeShoeBot

Today is the day you learn more about Footsites, and not just about sneakers and their value. So, when you wanna cop sneakers, you gotta know how, when, and where they’re dropping. And the where is actually as important as all the release details. Because it dictates what bot you should run, which proxies to use, and most importantly how high your hopes should be about copping. And being part of a cook group should be enough to keep you in the loop!
So if you’re a sneakerhead trying to get into the botting world, this is one of the guides you need to read. And if you’re already familiar with it all, there’s no harm in a recap and updates! Let’s take a look at everything footsites: What they are, how to cop from them, and why they’re important to the community. And if you wanna get the hang of it, you gotta know how bots work, right?
What Are Footsites
Well, basically they are all brands/websites under the Footlocker company. They are retailers and they all share the same release methods. So this means that all these websites can be accessed with bots the same way. Technically, they share the same system and backend, aka servers and databases. So it’s simple: if you get banned on one, you’re banned on all. But naturally, you can avoid that using the right Footsites proxies!
Footsites include the following brands:
Foot Locker Kids
Foot Locker US
Lady Foot Locker
Foot Locker Canada
Footaction
Champs Sports
Eastbay
Why Are Footsites a Big Part of the Sneaker Industry?
Foot Locker to the sneaker industry is like Kleenex to tissue papers! And this kinda applies to all Footsites, for a reason. If you go to any of these websites with any sports gear in mind, you’ll find it! From exclusive sneaker drops to jerseys and basketballs, it’s everything a devoted sneakerhead needs.
Moreover, Footsites get a big chunk of stocks, so statistically speaking, there’s more chance to cop at some point from Footsites than from most other retailers! With bigger stocks of exclusive releases come the big resale digits. And because the market goes where the money goes, Footsites sit on a high pedestal!
2020’s Best Footsites Bots
The sneaker market is almost saturated with sneaker bots, but not all of them work. None of them work really well all the time either. In fact, some work on only certain types of sites. There are different kinds of bots like Shopify bots, Footsites bots, all-in-one, and of course Nike and Supreme bots.
If you’re looking for a bot to start your copping journey, we got your back as usual. But because Footsites are pretty popular, new Footsites-only bots are joining the game regularly, and some of them look really promising. And now, we’re going to give you a look at some of the best and most established Footsites bots, in no particular order!
2021 Update: The best Footsites bots are still dominating the game. So what applied in 2020 still applies in 2021. Just make sure you do your research before you choose the right bot for you!
NSB
Availability: In stock
Price: $499/year
OS: Windows, Mac
Bot Type: All-in-one
BUY HERE
Not only is NSB in-stock and an all-in-one bot, but it’s also one of the best and easiest Footsites bots to use! And because setting up for releases couldn’t get easier and with the right ingredients, you’re guaranteed to cop multiple pairs of whatever sneaker you’re copping on Footsites.
Moreover, NSB is also a top-tier Supreme bot with a very high success rate every week. So you got yourself the whole copping package. Need to know more about sneaker copping and reselling before you go ankle-deep into the industry with NSB? Check our blog for everything you might need!
And to know more about other amazing Footsites bots, keep reading. The market has a bunch of awesome bots that’ll get you exactly what you need, sneakers worth flexing and flipping!
Cybersole
Availability: Out of stock
Price: £300/6 month, then £100/6 months
OS: Windows 8 and 10
Kodai
Price: $175/2 months, then $44. 99/month
Prism
Price: $400/first 3 months, then $150/3 months
Phantom
Price: $300/6 months, then $150 renewal
Wrath
Price: $250/3 months
All these bots are good on Footsites and cop so much every release! But some offer more advantages than others.
Having an all-in-one bot saves you a lot of effort and money. Since you’d be able to cop any exclusive item you wish to own or resell. And we’re not talking about copping a pair or 2, we’re talking about mass copping making you thousands of dollars profit on one release. Like this guy!
Moreover, in-stock bots like NSB save you the pain of waiting for restocks and paying resale prices. NSB is one of the best and most reliable sneaker bots out there. Therefore, it makes copping and reselling a very profitable side advantage you can enjoy if you choose it!
Post Views:
26, 114
Tags: sneaker bot, sneaker resale, sneaker resell, sneaker reselling Posted in Nike Shoe Bot, Sneaker Bot
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Frequently Asked Questions about bot release

What is release bot?

A GitHub App that creates GitHub Releases following Conventional Commits. Git tags (based on SemVer) Release date. Release types: Bug Fixes, New Features and BREAKING CHANGES (follow Conventional Commits’s type)

How do bots release sneakers?

There is no law that forbids you from using an actual sneaker bot to buy sneakers or anything else. However, sneaker bots usually violate the store’s terms and conditions and whatnot. You see, some stores have a 1 pair per customer policy.Jul 1, 2021

Is it illegal to use bots to buy shoes?

What Are Footsites. Well, basically they are all brands/websites under the Footlocker company. They are retailers and they all share the same release methods. So this means that all these websites can be accessed with bots the same way. Technically, they share the same system and backend, aka servers and databases.Sep 18, 2020

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