Can A Computer Be Tracked By Ip Address

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Tracking Stolen Computers Using the IP Address – Small …

Your computer network’s Internet Protocol (IP) address identifies its location in cyberspace when someone sends email or other data to you over the Internet. An IP address can also identify your computer if someone steals it. There are several software programs that detect when the thief has used your computer to go online, but tracking the computer over the Internet is easier than finding the computer’s real-world location. IP Address Programs like Advatrack, Adeona and Absolute Software can locate your computer’s IP address once the thief using it goes online. After you download the software to your computer, it starts regularly contacting the developer, updating them on which network IP address the computer uses to access the Internet. If someone steals your computer, you can log on to the tracking company’s website, enter your identification and password and access information about the current IP address. Physical Location Once you have the IP address, the next challenge is getting your computer’s physical location. The Internet provider the thief uses can give you the address, but may refuse to do so to protect its customer’s privacy. Your anti-theft software may be able to extrapolate the location from the IP address. Some software incorporates Global Positioning System and Wi-Fi tracking so that it records the physical address along with the IP address, making it easier to locate your computer. Legal Problems A 2011 court case raises potential legal problems for IP-tracking companies. When Absolute Software tracked a stolen laptop to someone who’d unwittingly bought it from the thief, the company also turned up sexually explicit messages between the buyer and her boyfriend. The buyer sued on the grounds Absolute Software and the local police violated the privacy of her communications. At the time of publication, the case was still in the courts. Due Process Even if you track the IP address and identify the thief’s service provider, it usually takes a legal action to persuade providers to divulge the customer’s street address or name. If the police investigate, they can secure a court order or a subpoena requiring the company turn over the address. You can also file a civil lawsuit against the thief and request the information as part of the discovery process. This is a long-shot option, as you don’t even know the name of the person you’re suing. References Resources Writer Bio A graduate of Oberlin College, Fraser Sherman began writing in 1981. Since then he’s researched and written newspaper and magazine stories on city government, court cases, business, real estate and finance, the uses of new technologies and film history. Sherman has worked for more than a decade as a newspaper reporter, and his magazine articles have been published in “Newsweek, ” “Air & Space, ” “Backpacker” and “Boys’ Life. ” Sherman is also the author of three film reference books, with a fourth currently under way.
Can I Be Tracked by my IP Address - WhatIsMyIP.com®

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Can I Be Tracked by my IP Address – WhatIsMyIP.com®

Is it feasible to track my IP address if known by others?
Someone has my IP address, can they find me?
When you connect to the internet through your Internet Service Provider(ISP), they assign an IP address. Your IP address is similar to your mailing address, but for your computer, on the internet. While the IP address used to route internet traffic to your computer it does not reveal your location. If someone was able to get your IP address they could learn a bit about your internet service, such as which provider you use to connect to the internet, but they really can’t locate you, your home, or your office.
In some circumstances they may locate the city you are in, or perhaps a nearby city, but they will not have your physical address. Once they trace you back to your ISP they will lose your trail. While strangers may not be able to find you, your ISP knows where you are. ISPs will generally go to great lengths to protect you and your privacy but they do keep logs of your connections.
One big exception involving law enforcement. If you were to participate in illegal activities then a law enforcement agency can get a court order and submit it to your ISP to request your information. Obviously, easily finding you with law enforcement involved.
In the end, the simple answer is no, that you are unable to track my IP address. If someone was to get your IP address they can not find you. There are other ways you can be located but this isn’t one of them. Posting your name and town online via social media, more likely tracked, than by your IP address.
Can Someone Find Me? - What Is My IP Address

Can Someone Find Me? – What Is My IP Address

You probably don’t think too much about your IP address, but maybe it’s time you did.
Most people (and maybe you) know their IP address is a digital address of some sort that helps the Internet deliver content to your computer.
And perhaps you know that 99% of the time, no one else knows or cares to know what your IP address is.
But there’s more you need to know.
See, your IP address is something like a beacon on the Internet.
Your IP address is like a beacon on the Internet
Your IP address gives websites, and people that you have connected with online, more than just a number—more than your IP address.
It also gives them the ability to trace that IP address back towards you if they wanted to.
To be clear, they can trace it back to your geographical location.
Okay. It’s likely that 99% of the time no one (and no websites) are running your IP address through an IP lookup site to see where you’re located.
But you’ll never know if it does happen one percent of time, five percent, or more.
Here’s the point:
Anyone can find out where you are.
Even though a website, or even a person (maybe some acquaintance you once sent an email too) can’t find your home address from your IP address, they most definitely could get a clear picture of where you are.
• Even if you don’t tell them what city you’re in, they could use your IP address to get an idea of where you’re connecting from.
• Even if you only contacted them once, they can analyze your IP address anytime after that…it doesn’t need to be in real time.
• Even if you didn’t make a transaction of any kind with the site, they could still capture, analyze and trace your IP address back to your network.
It’s perfectly legal, yet most people aren’t even aware of this.
Are you?
Is this all hype, or fact?
You could be thinking this is just an exaggeration to scare you.
Well, here’s a true story that illustrates firsthand what we’re talking about.
Recently an office manager (we’ll call him John) decided to see what would happen if he analyzed his own IP address on He shared his story with us.
I know all about, but hadn’t explored the geolocation aspect of it—the map that drops a pinpoint on where the Internet says I am. I wanted to see how precise that might be. So, on the map on the homepage, I clicked on ‘Show me more about my IP. ’ And on the next screen, I clicked ‘Update my Location. ’ What I saw—and realized—sent a chill down my spine.
As I zoomed in as close as it would go, the map become a Google Earth image. And I the image I saw on my laptop screen was a satellite view of the kitchen window of my condo! And my street name was visible on the map too. Not my address, but the map was definitely where I lived. I was a little startled, and then it hit me—anyone who knew my home IP address had the ability to see the same map. I could imagine someone knocking at my door who tracked me (or my wife! ) just by knowing my IP address.
Here’s the bottom line…
It radically changed how John looked at his IP address. It also changed the way he used the Internet at home and when traveling.
When privacy hits close to home.
Here’s why the geolocation aspect of your IP address is important.
Most people use the Internet from just a few locations, primarily at home.
You shop mostly from home
You send emails to friends mostly from home
You game or join chatrooms and forums from home
With a simple device (that someone can find on Amazon) a stranger or criminal can peer inside your home through the front door peephole!
That means the majority of your online activity is probably coming from your home IP address—the IP address that could be traced back very close to you. Maybe even your kitchen window.
I can guess what you might be thinking:
“Who wants to know where I am anyway? ”
The true answer is, “who knows? ” That’s not meant to be cute.
There’s just no way of knowing who is running your IP address through any type of IP lookup service. It could be your bank, your real estate agent, or a tech-savvy teenager who’s also a hacker.
However, one thing is clear…
It is possible to be traced by someone—a stalker, an investigator or even a criminal—via your IP address. And that clever stranger might just wind up right at your door.
Also, if a person (hopefully not you! ) were going online and doing something illegal (according to the laws in place wherever you are in the world), a law enforcement or government agency might seek legal permission to contact your Internet Service Provider for information.
With a subpoena in hand, investigators would ask the ISP to provide the online account holder’s name and address.
The ISP would have no choice but to provide it for them.
Thankfully, for just about everyone that’s an extreme case.
But don’t feel too safe quite yet.
You must admit, it’s unsettling news to know that anyone who has captured your IP address in the past can come close to zeroing in on your front door, depending on where you live.
Here’s some good news:
You can stop IP trackers cold, if you know how.
Hide your real IP address. Hide your real location.
Wouldn’t it be great if you could somehow pull the “old switcheroo” and go online with a different IP address—an IP address that, when anybody tried to trace it, would send them off to some other location, miles from where you actually are?
Guess what? You can.
Here are a few ways you can do that:
Use the Internet away from home. Go to the library or the local coffee bar. You’ll have a different IP address. The drawback: It still close to home and public networks aren’t always safe from other eavesdroppers.
Use the Tor network. Tor is an entirely different kind of network that is free and available to all. The drawback: It doesn’t offer great security and there are some very odd characters in some corners of Tor.
Use a proxy. They’re a touch old-fashioned and tricky to use, but a proxy hides your actual IP address. The drawback: Many websites block proxy access.
Here’s the best way to hide your public IP address.
Go online and sign up for a Virtual Private
Network (VPN) account.
A VPN is a service that redirects your Internet requests through a secure “tunnel” that is hacker proof. But more importantly, a VPN service assigns your live connection a different IP address, then reroutes your Internet request to the world.
Here’s why using a Virtual Private Network is a good thing:
No person or website you connect with knows your actual IP address…which your VPN masks for you when you are online.
You can use your VPN at home, at hotels and airports, and especially at free Wi-Fi hot spots with unsecured networks.
Is it hard to find a good VPN?
Nope. We’ll help you out.
Click below and you can sign up with a top VPN provider right now. It’s fast, safe and easy.
And once you do, you can stop worrying about strange people potentially showing up at your front door.
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