Nginx Ingress Kubernetes Io Proxy Connect Timeout

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Annotations – NGINX Ingress Controller – Kubernetes

You can add these Kubernetes annotations to specific Ingress objects to customize their behavior. Tip Annotation keys and values can only be strings. Other types, such as boolean or numeric values must be quoted, i. e. “true”, “false”, “100”. Name type string cookie “balanced” or “persistent” “sticky” or “legacy” string string string basic or digest string number string string “true” or “false” string string string string string “true” or “false” string “true” or “false” string string string string number string string []int string “true” or “false” string string string string “true” or “false” number “true” or “false” “true” or “false” “true” or “false” number number number duration string string string number string “true” or “false” string string string number number number string number number string string string “1. 0” or “1. 1” string string string string string number string “true” or “false” URI string string string “true” or “false” string string “true” or “false” string “true” or “false” “true” or “false” “true” or “false” string string string string CIDR string number string string string “true” or “false” string “true” or “false” “true” or “false” “true” or “false” string string string string bool bool bool string string string string Canary ¶ In some cases, you may want to “canary” a new set of changes by sending a small number of requests to a different service than the production service. The canary annotation enables the Ingress spec to act as an alternative service for requests to route to depending on the rules applied. The following annotations to configure canary can be enabled after “true” is set: The header to use for notifying the Ingress to route the request to the service specified in the Canary Ingress. When the request header is set to always, it will be routed to the canary. When the header is set to never, it will never be routed to the canary. For any other value, the header will be ignored and the request compared against the other canary rules by precedence. The header value to match for notifying the Ingress to route the request to the service specified in the Canary Ingress. When the request header is set to this value, it will be routed to the canary. For any other header value, the header will be ignored and the request compared against the other canary rules by precedence. This annotation has to be used together with. The annotation is an extension of the to allow customizing the header value instead of using hardcoded values. It doesn’t have any effect if the annotation is not defined. This works the same way as canary-by-header-value except it does PCRE Regex matching. Note that when canary-by-header-value is set this annotation will be ignored. When the given Regex causes error during request processing, the request will be considered as not matching. The cookie to use for notifying the Ingress to route the request to the service specified in the Canary Ingress. When the cookie value is set to always, it will be routed to the canary. When the cookie is set to never, it will never be routed to the canary. For any other value, the cookie will be ignored and the request compared against the other canary rules by precedence. The integer based (0 – 100) percent of random requests that should be routed to the service specified in the canary Ingress. A weight of 0 implies that no requests will be sent to the service in the Canary ingress by this canary rule. A weight of 100 means implies all requests will be sent to the alternative service specified in the Ingress. Canary rules are evaluated in order of precedence. Precedence is as follows: canary-by-header -> canary-by-cookie -> canary-weight Note that when you mark an ingress as canary, then all the other non-canary annotations will be ignored (inherited from the corresponding main ingress) except,, and annotations related to session affinity. If you want to restore the original behavior of canaries when session affinity was ignored, set annotation with value legacy on the canary ingress definition. Known Limitations Currently a maximum of one canary ingress can be applied per Ingress rule. Rewrite ¶ In some scenarios the exposed URL in the backend service differs from the specified path in the Ingress rule. Without a rewrite any request will return 404. Set the annotation to the path expected by the service. If the Application Root is exposed in a different path and needs to be redirected, set the annotation to redirect requests for /. Example Please check the rewrite example. Session Affinity ¶ The annotation enables and sets the affinity type in all Upstreams of an Ingress. This way, a request will always be directed to the same upstream server. The only affinity type available for NGINX is cookie. The annotation defines the stickiness of a session. Setting this to balanced (default) will redistribute some sessions if a deployment gets scaled up, therefore rebalancing the load on the servers. Setting this to persistent will not rebalance sessions to new servers, therefore providing maximum stickiness. The annotation defines the behavior of canaries when session affinity is enabled. Setting this to sticky (default) will ensure that users that were served by canaries, will continue to be served by canaries. Setting this to legacy will restore original canary behavior, when session affinity was ignored. Attention If more than one Ingress is defined for a host and at least one Ingress uses cookie, then only paths on the Ingress using will use session cookie affinity. All paths defined on other Ingresses for the host will be load balanced through the random selection of a backend server. Example Please check the affinity example. Cookie affinity ¶ If you use the cookie affinity type you can also specify the name of the cookie that will be used to route the requests with the annotation The default is to create a cookie named ‘INGRESSCOOKIE’. The NGINX annotation defines the path that will be set on the cookie. This is optional unless the annotation is set to true; Session cookie paths do not support regex. Use to apply a SameSite attribute to the sticky cookie. Browser accepted values are None, Lax, and Strict. Some browsers reject cookies with SameSite=None, including those created before the SameSite=None specification (e. g. Chrome 5X). Other browsers mistakenly treat SameSite=None cookies as SameSite=Strict (e. Safari running on OSX 14). To omit SameSite=None from browsers with these incompatibilities, add the annotation “true”. Authentication ¶ It is possible to add authentication by adding additional annotations in the Ingress rule. The source of the authentication is a secret that contains usernames and passwords. The annotations are: [basic|digest]
Indicates the HTTP Authentication Type: Basic or Digest Access Authentication. secretName
The name of the Secret that contains the usernames and passwords which are granted access to the paths defined in the Ingress rules. This annotation also accepts the alternative form “namespace/secretName”, in which case the Secret lookup is performed in the referenced namespace instead of the Ingress namespace. [auth-file|auth-map]
The auth-secret can have two forms: auth-file – default, an htpasswd file in the key auth within the secret auth-map – the keys of the secret are the usernames, and the values are the hashed passwords “realm string”
Example Please check the auth example. Custom NGINX upstream hashing ¶ NGINX supports load balancing by client-server mapping based on consistent hashing for a given key. The key can contain text, variables or any combination thereof. This feature allows for request stickiness other than client IP or cookies. The ketama consistent hashing method will be used which ensures only a few keys would be remapped to different servers on upstream group changes. There is a special mode of upstream hashing called subset. In this mode, upstream servers are grouped into subsets, and stickiness works by mapping keys to a subset instead of individual upstream servers. Specific server is chosen uniformly at random from the selected sticky subset. It provides a balance between stickiness and load distribution. To enable consistent hashing for a backend: the nginx variable, text value or any combination thereof to use for consistent hashing. For example: “$request_uri” or “$request_uri$host” or “${request_uri}-text-value” to consistently hash upstream requests by the current request URI. “subset” hashing can be enabled setting “true”. This maps requests to subset of nodes instead of a single one. upstream-hash-by-subset-size determines the size of each subset (default 3). Please check the chashsubset example. Custom NGINX load balancing ¶ This is similar to load-balance in ConfigMap, but configures load balancing algorithm per ingress. Note that takes preference over this. If this and are not set then we fallback to using globally configured load balancing algorithm. Custom NGINX upstream vhost ¶ This configuration setting allows you to control the value for host in the following statement: proxy_set_header Host $host, which forms part of the location block. This is useful if you need to call the upstream server by something other than $host. Client Certificate Authentication ¶ It is possible to enable Client Certificate Authentication using additional annotations in Ingress Rule. Client Certificate Authentication is applied per host and it is not possible to specify rules that differ for individual paths. To enable, add the annotation namespace/secretName. This secret must have a file named containing the full Certificate Authority chain that is enabled to authenticate against this Ingress. You can further customize client certificate authentication and behaviour with these annotations: The validation depth between the provided client certificate and the Certification Authority chain. (default: 1) Enables verification of client certificates. Possible values are: on: Request a client certificate that must be signed by a certificate that is included in the secret key of the secret specified by namespace/secretName. Failed certificate verification will result in a status code 400 (Bad Request) (default) off: Don’t request client certificates and don’t do client certificate verification. optional: Do optional client certificate validation against the CAs from auth-tls-secret. The request fails with status code 400 (Bad Request) when a certificate is provided that is not signed by the CA. When no or an otherwise invalid certificate is provided, the request does not fail, but instead the verification result is sent to the upstream service. optional_no_ca: Do optional client certificate validation, but do not fail the request when the client certificate is not signed by the CAs from auth-tls-secret. Certificate verification result is sent to the upstream service. The URL/Page that user should be redirected in case of a Certificate Authentication Error Indicates if the received certificates should be passed or not to the upstream server in the header ssl-client-cert. Possible values are “true” or “false” (default). The following headers are sent to the upstream service according to the auth-tls-* annotations: ssl-client-issuer-dn: The issuer information of the client certificate. Example: “CN=My CA” ssl-client-subject-dn: The subject information of the client certificate. Example: “CN=My Client” ssl-client-verify: The result of the client verification. Possible values: “SUCCESS”, “FAILED: ” ssl-client-cert: The full client certificate in PEM format. Will only be sent when is set to “true”. Example: —–BEGIN%20CERTIFICATE—–%0A… —END%20CERTIFICATE—–%0A Backend Certificate Authentication ¶ It is possible to authenticate to a proxied HTTPS backend with certificate using additional annotations in Ingress Rule. secretName: Specifies a Secret with the certificate, key in PEM format used for authentication to a proxied HTTPS server. It should also contain trusted CA certificates in PEM format used to verify the certificate of the proxied HTTPS server. This annotation expects the Secret name in the form “namespace/secretName”. Enables or disables verification of the proxied HTTPS server certificate. (default: off) Sets the verification depth in the proxied HTTPS server certificates chain. (default: 1) Specifies the enabled ciphers for requests to a proxied HTTPS server. The ciphers are specified in the format understood by the OpenSSL library. Allows to set proxy_ssl_name. This allows overriding the server name used to verify the certificate of the proxied HTTPS server. This value is also passed through SNI when a connection is established to the proxied HTTPS server. Enables the specified protocols for requests to a proxied HTTPS server. Enables passing of the server name through TLS Server Name Indication extension (SNI, RFC 6066) when establishing a connection with the proxied HTTPS server. Configuration snippet ¶ Using this annotation you can add additional configuration to the NGINX location. For example: |
more_set_headers “Request-Id: $req_id”;
Custom HTTP Errors ¶ Like the custom–errors value in the ConfigMap, this annotation will set NGINX proxy-intercept-errors, but only for the NGINX location associated with this ingress. If a default backend annotation is specified on the ingress, the errors will be routed to that annotation’s default backend service (instead of the global default backend). Different ingresses can specify different sets of error codes. Even if multiple ingress objects share the same hostname, this annotation can be used to intercept different error codes for each ingress (for example, different error codes to be intercepted for different paths on the same hostname, if each path is on a different ingress). If custom–errors is also specified globally, the error values specified in this annotation will override the global value for the given ingress’ hostname and path. Example usage: “404, 415”
Default Backend ¶ This annotation is of the form to specify a custom default backend. This is a reference to a service inside of the same namespace in which you are applying this annotation. This annotation overrides the global default backend. In case the service has multiple ports, the first one is the one which will received the backend traffic. This service will be used to handle the response when the configured service in the Ingress rule does not have any active endpoints. It will also be used to handle the error responses if both this annotation and the custom–errors annotation are set. Enable CORS ¶ To enable Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) in an Ingress rule, add the annotation “true”. This will add a section in the server location enabling this functionality. CORS can be controlled with the following annotations: Controls which methods are accepted. This is a multi-valued field, separated by ‘, ‘ and accepts only letters (upper and lower case). Default: GET, PUT, POST, DELETE, PATCH, OPTIONS Example: “PUT, GET, POST, OPTIONS” Controls which headers are accepted. This is a multi-valued field, separated by ‘, ‘ and accepts letters, numbers, _ and -. Default: DNT, X-CustomHeader, Keep-Alive, User-Agent, X-Requested-With, If-Modified-Since, Cache-Control, Content-Type, Authorization Example: “X-Forwarded-For, X-app123-XPTO” Controls which headers are exposed to response. This is a multi-valued field, separated by ‘, ‘ and accepts letters, numbers, _, – and *. Default: empty Example: “*, X-CustomResponseHeader” Controls what’s the accepted Origin for CORS. This is a single field value, with the following format: (s) or (s) Default: * Example: ” Controls if credentials can be passed during CORS operations. Default: true Example: “false” Controls how long preflight requests can be cached. Default: 1728000 Example: 600 HTTP2 Push Preload. ¶ Enables automatic conversion of preload links specified in the “Link” response header fields into push requests. Example “true” Server Alias ¶ Allows the definition of one or more aliases in the server definition of the NGINX configuration using the annotation “, “. This will create a server with the same configuration, but adding new values to the server_name directive. Note A server-alias name cannot conflict with the hostname of an existing server. If it does, the server-alias annotation will be ignored. If a server-alias is created and later a new server with the same hostname is created, the new server configuration will take place over the alias configuration. For more information please see the server_name documentation. Server snippet ¶ Using the annotation it is possible to add custom configuration in the server configuration block. apiVersion:
kind: Ingress
metadata:
annotations:
|
set $agentflag 0;
if ($_user_agent ~* “(Mobile)”){
set $agentflag 1;}
if ( $agentflag = 1) {
return 301}
Attention This annotation can be used only once per host. Client Body Buffer Size ¶ Sets buffer size for reading client request body per location. In case the request body is larger than the buffer, the whole body or only its part is written to a temporary file. By default, buffer size is equal to two memory pages. This is 8K on x86, other 32-bit platforms, and x86-64. It is usually 16K on other 64-bit platforms. This annotation is applied to each location provided in the ingress rule. Note The annotation value must be given in a format understood by Nginx. Example “1000” # 1000 bytes 1k # 1 kilobyte 1K # 1 kilobyte 1m # 1 megabyte 1M # 1 megabyte For more information please see External Authentication ¶ To use an existing service that provides authentication the Ingress rule can be annotated with to indicate the URL where the HTTP request should be sent. “URL to the authentication service”
Additionally it is possible to set: to specify the HTTP method to use. to specify the location of the error page. to specify the URL parameter in the error page which should contain the original URL for a failed signin request. to specify headers to pass to backend once authentication request completes. the name of a ConfigMap that specifies headers to pass to the authentication service to specify the X-Auth-Request-Redirect header value. this enables caching for auth requests. specify a lookup key for auth responses. $remote_user$_authorization. Each server and location has it’s own keyspace. Hence a cached response is only valid on a per-server and per-location basis. to specify a caching time for auth responses based on their response codes, e. 200 202 30m. See proxy_cache_valid for details. You may specify multiple, comma-separated values: 200 202 10m, 401 5m. defaults to 200 202 401 5m. to specify a custom snippet to use with external authentication, e. |
proxy_set_header Foo-Header 42;
Note: is an optional annotation. However, it may only be used in conjunction with and will be ignored if is not set Global External Authentication ¶ By default the controller redirects all requests to an existing service that provides authentication if global-auth-url is set in the NGINX ConfigMap. If you want to disable this behavior for that ingress, you can use enable-global-auth: “false” in the NGINX ConfigMap. indicates if GlobalExternalAuth configuration should be applied or not to this Ingress rule. Default values is set to “true”. Rate Limiting ¶ These annotations define limits on connections and transmission rates. These can be used to mitigate DDoS Attacks. number of concurrent connections allowed from a single IP address. A 503 error is returned when exceeding this limit. number of requests accepted from a given IP each second. The burst limit is set to this limit multiplied by the burst multiplier, the default multiplier is 5. When clients exceed this limit, limit-req-status-code default: 503 is returned. number of requests accepted from a given IP each minute. multiplier of the limit rate for burst size. The default burst multiplier is 5, this annotation override the default multiplier. initial number of kilobytes after which the further transmission of a response to a given connection will be rate limited. This feature must be used with proxy-buffering enabled. number of kilobytes per second allowed to send to a given connection. The zero value disables rate limiting. client IP source ranges to be excluded from rate-limiting. The value is a comma separated list of CIDRs. If you specify multiple annotations in a single Ingress rule, limits are applied in the order limit-connections, limit-rpm, limit-rps. To configure settings globally for all Ingress rules, the limit-rate-after and limit-rate values may be set in the NGINX ConfigMap. The value set in an Ingress annotation will override the global setting. The client IP address will be set based on the use of PROXY protocol or from the X-Forwarded-For header value when use-forwarded-headers is enabled. Global Rate Limiting ¶ Note: Be careful when configuring both (Local) Rate Limiting and Global Rate Limiting at the same time. They are two completely different rate limiting implementations. Whichever limit exceeds first will reject the requests. It might be a good idea to configure both of them to ease load on Global Rate Limiting backend in cases of spike in traffic. The stock NGINX rate limiting does not share its counters among different NGINX instances. Given that most ingress-nginx deployments are elastic and number of replicas can change any day it is impossible to configure a proper rate limit using stock NGINX functionalities. Global Rate Limiting overcome this by using lua-resty-global-throttle. lua-resty-global-throttle shares its counters via a central store such as memcached. The obvious shortcoming of this is users have to deploy and operate a memcached instance in order to benefit from this functionality. Configure the memcached using these configmap settings. Here are a few remarks for ingress-nginx integration of lua-resty-global-throttle: We minimize memcached access by caching exceeding limit decisions. The expiry of cache entry is the desired delay lua-resty-global-throttle calculates for us. The Lua Shared Dictionary used for that is global_throttle_cache. Currently its size defaults to 10M. Customize it as per your needs using lua-shared-dicts. When we fail to cache the exceeding limit decision then we log an NGINX error. You can monitor for that error to decide if you need to bump the cache size. Without cache the cost of processing a request is two memcached commands: GET, and INCR. With the cache it is only INCR. Log NGINX variable $global_rate_limit_exceeding’s value to have some visibility into what portion of requests are rejected (value y), whether they are rejected using cached decision (value c), or if they are not rejeced (default value n). You can use log-format-upstream to include that in access logs. In case of an error it will log the error message and fail open. The annotations below creates Global Rate Limiting instance per ingress. That means if there are multuple paths configured under the same ingress, the Global Rate Limiting will count requests to all the paths under the same counter. Extract a path out into its own ingress if you need to isolate a certain path. Configures maximum allowed number of requests per window. Required. Configures a time window (i. e 1m) that the limit is applied. Configures a key for counting the samples. Defaults to $remote_addr. You can also combine multiple NGINX variables here, like ${remote_addr}-${_x_api_client} which would mean the limit will be applied to requests coming from the same API client (indicated by X-API-Client HTTP request header) with the same source IP address. comma separated list of IPs and CIDRs to match client IP against. When there’s a match request is not considered for rate limiting. Permanent Redirect ¶ This annotation allows to return a permanent redirect (Return Code 301) instead of sending data to the upstream. For example would redirect everything to Google. Permanent Redirect Code ¶ This annotation allows you to modify the status code used for permanent redirects. For example ‘308’ would return your permanent-redirect with a 308. Temporal Redirect ¶ This annotation allows you to return a temporal redirect (Return Code 302) instead of sending data to the upstream. For example would redirect everything to Google with a Return Code of 302 (Moved Temporarily) SSL Passthrough ¶ The annotation instructs the controller to send TLS connections directly to the backend instead of letting NGINX decrypt the communication. See also TLS/HTTPS in the User guide. Note SSL Passthrough is disabled by default and requires starting the controller with the –enable-ssl-passthrough flag. Attention Because SSL Passthrough works on layer 4 of the OSI model (TCP) and not on the layer 7 (HTTP), using SSL Passthrough invalidates all the other annotations set on an Ingress object. Service Upstream ¶ By default the NGINX ingress controller uses a list of all endpoints (Pod IP/port) in the NGINX upstream configuration. The annotation disables that behavior and instead uses a single upstream in NGINX, the service’s Cluster IP and port. This can be desirable for things like zero-downtime deployments as it reduces the need to reload NGINX configuration when Pods come up and down. See issue #257. Known Issues ¶ If the service-upstream annotation is specified the following things should be taken into consideration: Sticky Sessions will not work as only round-robin load balancing is supported. The proxy_next_upstream directive will not have any effect meaning on error the request will not be dispatched to another upstream. Server-side HTTPS enforcement through redirect ¶ By default the controller redirects (308) to HTTPS if TLS is enabled for that ingress. If you want to disable this behavior globally, you can use ssl-redirect: “false” in the NGINX ConfigMap. To configure this feature for specific ingress resources, you can use the “false” annotation in the particular resource. When using SSL offloading outside of cluster (e. AWS ELB) it may be useful to enforce a redirect to HTTPS even when there is no TLS certificate available. This can be achieved by using the “true” annotation in the particular resource. To preserve the trailing slash in the URI with ssl-redirect, set “true” annotation for that particular resource. Redirect from/to www ¶ In some scenarios is required to redirect from to or vice versa. To enable this feature use the annotation “true” Attention If at some point a new Ingress is created with a host equal to one of the options (like) the annotation will be omitted. Attention For HTTPS to HTTPS redirects is mandatory the SSL Certificate defined in the Secret, located in the TLS section of Ingress, contains both FQDN in the common name of the certificate. Whitelist source range ¶ You can specify allowed client IP source ranges through the annotation. The value is a comma separated list of CIDRs, e. 10. 0. 0/24, 172. 1. To configure this setting globally for all Ingress rules, the whitelist-source-range value may be set in the NGINX ConfigMap. Note Adding an annotation to an Ingress rule overrides any global restriction. Custom timeouts ¶ Using the configuration configmap it is possible to set the default global timeout for connections to the upstream servers. In some scenarios is required to have different values. To allow this we provide annotations that allows this customization: Note: All timeout values are unitless and in seconds e. “120” sets a valid 120 seconds proxy read timeout. Proxy redirect ¶ With the annotations and it is possible to set the text that should be changed in the Location and Refresh header fields of a proxied server response Setting “off” or “default” in the annotation disables, otherwise, both annotations must be used in unison. Note that each annotation must be a string without spaces. By default the value of each annotation is “off”. Custom max body size ¶ For NGINX, an 413 error will be returned to the client when the size in a request exceeds the maximum allowed size of the client request body. This size can be configured by the parameter client_max_body_size. To configure this setting globally for all Ingress rules, the proxy-body-size value may be set in the NGINX ConfigMap. To use custom values in an Ingress rule define these annotation: 8m
Proxy cookie domain ¶ Sets a text that should be changed in the domain attribute of the “Set-Cookie” header fields of a proxied server response. To configure this setting globally for all Ingress rules, the proxy-cookie-domain value may be set in the NGINX ConfigMap. Proxy cookie path ¶ Sets a text that should be changed in the path attribute of the “Set-Cookie” header fields of a proxied server response. To configure this setting globally for all Ingress rules, the proxy-cookie-path value may be set in the NGINX ConfigMap. Proxy buffering ¶ Enable or disable proxy buffering proxy_buffering. By default proxy buffering is disabled in the NGINX config. To configure this setting globally for all Ingress rules, the proxy-buffering value may be set in the NGINX ConfigMap. To use custom values in an Ingress rule define these annotation: “on”
Proxy buffers Number ¶ Sets the number of the buffers in proxy_buffers used for reading the first part of the response received from the proxied server. By default proxy buffers number is set as 4 To configure this setting globally, set proxy-buffers-number in NGINX ConfigMap. To use custom values in an Ingress rule, define this annotation: “4”
Proxy buffer size ¶ Sets the size of the buffer proxy_buffer_size used for reading the first part of the response received from the proxied server. By default proxy buffer size is set as “4k” To configure this setting globally, set proxy-buffer-size in NGINX ConfigMap. To use custom values in an Ingress rule, define this annotation: “8k”
Proxy max temp file size ¶ When buffering of responses from the proxied server is enabled, and the whole response does not fit into the buffers set by the proxy_buffer_size and proxy_buffers directives, a part of the response can be saved to a temporary file. This directive sets the maximum size of the temporary file setting the proxy_max_temp_file_size. The size of data written to the temporary file at a time is set by the proxy_temp_file_write_size directive. The zero value disables buffering of responses to temporary files. To use custom values in an Ingress rule, define this annotation: “1024m”
Proxy HTTP version ¶ Using this annotation sets the proxy__version that the Nginx reverse proxy will use to communicate with the backend. By default this is set to “1. 1”. “1. 0”
SSL ciphers ¶ Specifies the enabled ciphers. Using this annotation will set the ssl_ciphers directive at the server level. This configuration is active for all the paths in the host. “ALL:! aNULL:! EXPORT56:RC4+RSA:+HIGH:+MEDIUM:+LOW:+SSLv2:+EXP”
The following annotation will set the ssl_prefer_server_ciphers directive at the server level. This configuration specifies that server ciphers should be preferred over client ciphers when using the SSLv3 and TLS protocols. “true”
Using this annotation will override the default connection header set by NGINX. To use custom values in an Ingress rule, define the annotation: “keep-alive”
Enable Access Log ¶ Access logs are enabled by default, but in some scenarios access logs might be required to be disabled for a given ingress. To do this, use the annotation: “false”
Enable Rewrite Log ¶ Rewrite logs are not enabled by default. In some scenarios it could be required to enable NGINX rewrite logs. Note that rewrite logs are sent to the error_log file at the notice level. To enable this feature use the annotation: “true”
Enable Opentracing ¶ Opentracing can be enabled or disabled globally through the ConfigMap but this will sometimes need to be overridden to enable it or disable it for a specific ingress (e. to turn off tracing of external health check endpoints) “true”
To add the non-standard X-Forwarded-Prefix header to the upstream request with a string value, the following annotation can be used: “/path”
ModSecurity ¶ ModSecurity is an OpenSource Web Application firewall. It can be enabled for a particular set of ingress locations. The ModSecurity module must first be enabled by enabling ModSecurity in the ConfigMap. Note this will enable ModSecurity for all paths, and each path must be disabled manually. It
proxy timeout annotations have no effect on nginx · Issue #2007

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proxy timeout annotations have no effect on nginx · Issue #2007

NGINX Ingress controller version: 0. 10. 2 /
Kubernetes version (use kubectl version):
Client Version: {Major:”1″, Minor:”9″, GitVersion:”v1. 9. 1″, GitCommit:”3a1c9449a956b6026f075fa3134ff92f7d55f812″, GitTreeState:”clean”, BuildDate:”2018-01-04T11:52:23Z”, GoVersion:”go1. 2″, Compiler:”gc”, Platform:”linux/amd64″}
Server Version: {Major:”1″, Minor:”9″, GitVersion:”v1. 2″, GitCommit:”5fa2db2bd46ac79e5e00a4e6ed24191080aa463b”, GitTreeState:”clean”, BuildDate:”2018-01-18T09:42:01Z”, GoVersion:”go1. 2″, Compiler:”gc”, Platform:”linux/amd64″}
Environment:
Cloud provider or hardware configuration: Bare metal / On premise
OS (e. g. from /etc/os-release): Debian GNU/Linux 9 (stretch)
Kernel (e. uname -a): 4. 0-5-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4. 65-3+deb9u2 (2018-01-04) x86_64 GNU/Linux
Install tools: kubeadm
Others:
What happened:
NGINX Ingress Controller v0. 2 configuration doesn’t reflect the proxy timeout annotations per Ingress.
This Ingress definition doesn’t work as expected:

kind: Ingress
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
metadata:
name: ing-manh-telnet-client
annotations:
“nginx”
‑connect‑timeout: 30
‑read‑timeout: 1800
‑send‑timeout: 1800
“false”
spec:
tls:
– hosts:
– “”
secretName: “tls-certs-domainio”
rules:
– host: “”:
paths:
– path: “/”
backend:
serviceName: svc-manh-telnet-client
servicePort:
The actual vhost:
# Custom headers to proxied server
proxy_connect_timeout 30s;
proxy_send_timeout 180s;
proxy_read_timeout 180s;
What you expected to happen:
The wanted vhost:
proxy_send_timeout 1800s;
proxy_read_timeout 1800s;
How to reproduce it (as minimally and precisely as possible):
Anything else we need to know:
increase proxy_send_timeout and proxy_read_timeout ...

increase proxy_send_timeout and proxy_read_timeout …

Im running deployments on GKE,
using image as nginx-ingress-controller
Im trying to increase proxy_send_timeout and proxy_read_timeout following to this link
here is my ingress config:
apiVersion: extensions/v1beta1
kind: Ingress
metadata:
name: nginx-ingress
namespace: production
annotations:
“nginx”
“360s”
100m
spec:
rules:
– host::
paths:
– backend:
serviceName: front-app
servicePort: 80
serviceName: backend-app
tls:
– hosts:

secretName: tls-secret-my-com
secretName: tls-secret-old-com
still this does not change the proxy_send_timeout and proxy_read_timeout
requests which take longer than 60s (default nginx timeout) are closed
I see this log:
[error] 20967#20967: * upstream prematurely closed connection while reading response header from upstream, client: 123. 456. 789. 12, server:, request: “GET /v1/example HTTP/2. 0”, upstream: “, host: “”, referrer: ”
when I go into the nginx pod:
> kubectl exec -it nginx-ingress-controller-xxxx-yyyy -n ingress-nginx — bash
> cat /etc/nginx/
output:
server {
server_name _;
listen 80 default_server backlog=511;
location / {
# Custom headers to proxied server
proxy_connect_timeout 5s;
proxy_send_timeout 60s;
proxy_read_timeout 60s;
proxy_send_timeout and proxy_read_timeout are set to 60s and not 360s as I configured on the ingress
so I tried changing manually the timeout on nginx conf, and then I did not get the timeout on the client, but every time the nginx is restarted the values are returned to the default 60s
how can I configure currectly the timeouts on the ingress?

Frequently Asked Questions about nginx ingress kubernetes io proxy connect timeout

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